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License to Carry Course in Teague, Texas.

Interested in taking a Texas license to carry course or permitless carry course in Teague? JTF Consulting now offers several options for those that don’t want to travel to Waco or even further at times. We offer an online class that allows you to do the classroom portion from anywhere and do your qualification when you have time or with another instructor. Our blended option includes the range qualification with the online class. We also offer a full in person class when time permits and ranges are available.

WHY ONLINE?

The state of Texas has made it easy to get your Texas LTC. You can now take the class online at your own pace from the comfort of your home. No crowded classrooms!

Our online course works on all devices including your smartphone! It’s also so easy that we have a pass guarantee! We make getting your Texas license to carry easy.

Unlike the others, once you complete our online license to carry class you can download your state certificate of training (LTC101) immediately. Our course is fully automated.

Why Choose Us Over The Others?

We have taken most of the other courses and below is a list of why ours is better than a lot of the others. DPS also told us that OUR course was a pleasure to take compared to others they reviewed.

  • Others simply put up a copy of the Texas penal code text and make you read it! We verbally TEACH, BREAKDOWN and EXPLAIN everything to you.
  • With our course you can immediately download your certificate of training (LTC101) as soon as you finish our course. Others make you wait several days.
  • Our course is TRULY mobile ready, others say they are but their system is HARD to use on mobile devices like your smartphone.
  • We answer student emails within minutes, others take days to respond. We provide the best customer service 7 days a week.
  • We have a pass guarantee. Our course is so easy that we have a pass guarantee.

Online Texas License To Carry Class in Teague, Texas.

Ready to get started? Click on the link below and get certified today! We make it easy.

Or see more courses we offer HERE.

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Texas License to Carry Course in Central Texas

Texas online License to Carry
Texas online License to Carry

Interested in taking a Texas license to carry course or permitless carry course in Central Texas? JTF Consulting now offers several options for those that don’t want to travel to Waco or even further at times. We offer an online class that allows you to do the classroom portion from anywhere and do your qualification when you have time or with another instructor. Our blended option includes the range qualification with the online class. We also offer a full in person class when time permits and ranges are available.

WHY ONLINE?

The state of Texas has made it easy to get your Texas LTC. You can now take the class online at your own pace from the comfort of your home. No crowded classrooms!

Our online course works on all devices including your smartphone! It’s also so easy that we have a pass guarantee! We make getting your Texas license to carry easy.

Unlike the others, once you complete our online license to carry class you can download your state certificate of training (LTC101) immediately. Our course is fully automated.

Why Choose Us Over The Others?

We have taken most of the other courses and below is a list of why ours is better than a lot of the others. DPS also told us that OUR course was a pleasure to take compared to others they reviewed.

  • Others simply put up a copy of the Texas penal code text and make you read it! We verbally TEACH, BREAKDOWN and EXPLAIN everything to you.
  • With our course you can immediately download your certificate of training (LTC101) as soon as you finish our course. Others make you wait several days.
  • Our course is TRULY mobile ready, others say they are but their system is HARD to use on mobile devices like your smartphone.
  • We answer student emails within minutes, others take days to respond. We provide the best customer service 7 days a week.
  • We have a pass guarantee. Our course is so easy that we have a pass guarantee.

Online Texas License To Carry Class

Ready to get started? Click on the link below and get certified today! We make it easy.

Or see more courses we offer HERE.

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Optimized Carrier Key Screws (OCKS)

Description

The Optimized Carrier Key Screws ( OCKS ) by Ned Christiansen are designed to provide significant advantages over the standard cap screw used in carrier keys. These were designed to be a significant improvement over the standard and are quickly becoming the new standard in gas carrier screws.

Proper staking is crucial to reliable operation. An improperly staked carrier key can become loose under firing, and can cause a debilitating malfunction that can render a firearm inoperable in the field. The OKCS has sharp, deep, and effective knurling with 12 deeper splines. These OCKS allow for metal to flow into the space when staking, creating more metal on metal contact. These are the same screws used in our bolt carriers.

As explained by Ned himself:

“Many AR15 brands these days come with inferior carrier key screws. Even some bolt carriers that have “OK” staking will still suffer from the screws coming loose because the manufacturer has used Asia-sourced screws with heads featuring knurling that is knurling in name only (shallow, rounded, wimpy “knurling”), which does not come near the top of the screw’s head where the staking will be. Further, the top of the screw head is well rounded and downright shiny. In other words, there is nothing there on the screw head for the staking job to engage in. Result: loose screws just as if they had not been staked at all, and your gun stops working. The OCKS is purpose-made for the AR15 application and features “real” knurling that goes all the way to the top of the head, which is not rounded. Plus, there are twelve splines on the head giving depressions and projections for carrier key metal to stake/flow into and engage like gear teeth– giving the best possible retention of carrier key screws. These are US-made and being recognized by some manufacturers as the new standard.”

JTF proudly uses these American made parts in our Bolt Carrier Groups and carbines. You can find them in our store HERE.

You can see how the staking really bites into the screws.

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What’s in an IFAK? And what is it?

-IFAK-Trauma Kits-Blow Out Kits-

So you want to be prepared and you don’t want to be a statistic, great! You got the guns, the blades the armor and the mindset, but are you ready for the aftermath? Life happens, injuries and accidents occur and it never ceases to amaze me the number of people I meet that don’t even have a first aid kit, let alone any first aid training. Luckily since you’re reading this, I’m assuming you’re not one of those people.

You’re here to better arm yourself against life and the world at large…

… and an IFAK is a great addition to have in a time of need.

So lets break it down and set it up!

What is an IFAK?

An IFAK is an acronym for Individual First Aid Kit, but the term first aid kit itself can be pretty generic. It can be as simple as a few bandages and tape, or as advanced as a field surgical kit. For the purpose of this article we will be covering the IFAK intended for common trauma associated with combat injuries.

This kit from Lightning X is for vehicles and mounts to a headrest.
This kit by NAR is worn on the Ankle.

Above are a few examples of kits for similar purposes but with different configurations. An IFAK is really only limited by 3 things

  1. Cost- Quality medical equipment generally comes with a substantial price tag.
  2. Size/Location- Its unrealistic that a 3 person IFAK would fit in an ankle kit, some items can also be bulky.
  3. Training/Expertise- I suggest you only carry what you’re trained on, anything else is basically pointless.

Let’s get in to some specifics on these three topic below.

Let’s talk MONEY

If you’ve looked into IFAKS at all I’m sure you’ve noticed at least one thing. The Price. Quality medical equipment is expensive, but why? Lets look at the humble Tourniquet, there isn’t much to it, but some can cost upwards of $40-$50. One of the main things that determines this price is validation and certification. If your product caan get a stamp of approval from CoTCCC, the military or really any certifying agency, you can charge good money. Those stamps can be expensive though, they require products to test, testing itself and usually field evaluations. All this takes time and money, and companies want that back. Another reason is hopefully quality. Let’s face it, making something high quality is going to cost more that the same item of low quality, that’s just how the world works. A good chunk of money goes in to manufacturing and quality control. The last one I’ll touch on is availability, there aren’t exactly a lot of players in this market. So if you have a quality, effective product and one of the only manufacturers, you can kind of charge what you want.

A lot of what I mentioned above applies to all aspects of the healthcare industry, and personal trauma management is not immune. So when you start looking at premade kits, or even assembling your own, expect to spend between $60 to infinity dollars. Really anything less that $60 should be approached with skepticism, there are SO many fake tourniquets and other devices out there, DO NOT short yourself in a crisis by purchasing a knockoff to save a few bucks.


Does Size Matter?

An age old question. And in reference to medical kits, yes and no. The size, style and number of medical kits really depends on a lot of things:

  • What you do
  • Where you’re going
  • What you’re wearing
  • Who is with you
  • What training you have.

#1 up there may not be important at all to you, you could be a full blown SWAT Medic or a suburban English teacher who likes to be prepared, but it can influence what you choose to pack in your kits. For example, if you are surrounded by people wearing body armor, you may need more items to address injuries to extremities, whereas people without body armor will have a greater chance of chest and torso trauma, in which chase you may need more chest darts and chest seals.

#2 on the list is not just terrain dependent, but also situational. Are you going to combat? The mall? Hiking? Hunting? All these play in to your needs and method of carry. You may need to switch out an extra tourniquet with a SAM splint as a hiker or camper, or add painkillers and antidiarrheal for your trip to the local Taco Bell.

#3 ah yes fashion! Why the hell does this matter? Well for starters, if your IFAK is attached to your 5.11 Rush12 pack along with your other kit, its probably not going to blend well with your Tux at a formal event. And Vice Versa, the ankle medical kit you wear to prom may not be enough for a hostile environment or multi person contingent.

#4 is all about the company you keep. Are you looking out for just you? A small family or team? a K9 or service animal? This factor can have a large impact on what and how you carry, not to mention the expense!

#5 is probably the most important. Training. If you have no idea how to use the equipment you have, why should you carry it? Are you hoping someone around you will know how to use it? Counting on some divine power imparting the knowledge on you in a time of need? Carry what you know, learn what you don’t and keep that cycle going.

Examples of various kit sizes and types.

What is in an IFAK?

So its called an Individual First Aid Kit, but what’s in it? Depends on your needs, it can be just a first aid kit with bandages, tape, pain relievers and gauze. Or it can be a kit specifically aimed at treating trauma, like I mentioned earlier in this article, I’ll be focusing on one set up for combat related injuries.

Setting up the needs for an IFAK can seem daunting, there are so many devices and items you can choose from. I find it easier to approach it from a TCCC or MARCH perspective, and then build on to that if necessary. TCCC is an acronym that stands for Tactical Combat Casualty Care and is pretty much the standard for care for field treatment of combat injuries in the military. Its often offered in a 3 day class from NAEMT and I highly recommend people take this class or its sister class TECC if they are going to carry, or be first responders. MARCH is an acronym that stands for:

M- Massive Hemorrhage

A- Airway

R- Respirations

C- Circulation

H- Head Injury/Hypothermia

If you follow those list of needs, you’ll be pretty well equipped to handle a variety of gun shot injuries, and other penetrating trauma.

For massive hemorrhage, common items in a kit include Tourniquets. This is the most effective way to stop extreme bleeding on extremities. There are also specialized tourniquets to help manage bleeding in pelvic and armpit areas.

Airways can be managed a variety of ways, surgically , mechanically, and positionally being the most common. For the purpose of this article we will only cover mechanical and positional. A common and easy to use airway is a Nasopharyngeal airway, or NPA. It’s easily carried in a kit, and almost just as easy to implement. The recovery position is a good example of a positional airway, basically position the patient in a way that makes breathing as easy as possible, as well as maintaining that position, whether conscious or not.

Circulation is usually the step where a tourniquet gets converted to a pressure dressing, and if applicable perform CPR and administer fluids. This stage is generally where the scene is semi-safe and you may be prepping for evac or hand off.

Head injury and hypothermia. I know head injury sounds pretty critical, and in many instances it is. Unfortunately in a combat situation or even a field situation, there is not a lot that first responders can do for those types of injuries. Usually all you can do is stabilize or immobilize the patient to prevent further damage and treat surface symptoms such as bleeding or exposure. I like to carry an inflatable c-spine stabilizer in my larger med bags for these kinds of events, its light, small and easy to use. Hypothermia is another danger you have to address. Like I said earlier, this stage is when you are getting ready to leave or hand off the patient, so getting them packaged up and warm is an important step. I carry blizzard/survival blankets, a packable litter and tape to wrap and pack my people up. By the time the MEDEVAC, TACEVAC, or CASEVAC gets there, you’ll be ready for handoff.

So whether you’re prepping for a road trip, going to the range, or just going about your day… a properly trained and equipped person can quite literally change a life. Think about what you do, where you go and plan accordingly, don’t carry what you don’t need and shop around, just because it’s expensive doesn’t mean it’s good. Thanks for reading and thank you for taking it upon yourself to be more prepared and trained for what life throws your way.

About the Author

The author is an 8 year veteran of the us army and us army reserves, serving as a 68w healthcare specialist/medic. he is also an 8 year veteran police officer who holds certifications in tactical combat casualty care from naemt and an advanced peace officer license in the state of texas. he enjoys the outdoors, firearms, video games and constantly searching for the next best gear and guns.

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Phokus Research – Wound Cube

So you’ve got the gear, but do you have the training? And better yet, do you practice? Most of the time the answer is no. I know so many people that have a tourniquet or an IFAK and have never trained on their use! Do I expect everyone to be a former Army Medic like me? No, of course not, but there are so many good educational resources out there online. If you don’t use those resources and learning materials, you’re doing yourself a great disservice.

One of those learning materials is the Wound Cube Gen 2 from Phokus Research. This cool silicone cube features 5 different wounds to practice wound packing and other interventions on, neat huh?

Wound packing is a critical perishable skill that needs to be practiced. Training without the appropriate tools can be difficult, though not impossible. After placing an effective tourniquet, the next step in Tactical Field Care is to convert the tourniquet to a pressure bandage if possible. In order to do that you have to pack the wound with either a hemostatic gauze or regular gauze and then apply a trauma bandage to the exterior. This cool little aid helps you master that packing skill on several different type of injuries and can be used over and over again!

Check out some of these pictures!

God I nerd out on shit like this

Add a little fake blood and you’re good to go! I love using this with my officers and private students alike and think its an invaluable training aid.

Here’s what it says on their website:

Our Re-Designed Wound Cube™ Genwound simulator has five large usable wound patterns designed into a transparent soft silicone cube.

The Wound Cube™ Genwas designed to increase muscle memory for students learning the basics of bleeding control. Our design allows for more effective training in any classroom setting.

Over the last two years we have collected feedback from hundreds of trainers and students.  Our GenCube has been completely redesigned with all those comments in mind.

  • Wet or Dry training device – master the basics
  • Semi-transparent
  • 3x Gunshot Wounds – Flat, Large, and XL
  • 2x Large Lacerations
  • Realistic Tissue Loss
  • Realistic Tissue Density
  • Compact Design (No wasted space)
  • Durably built
  • Affordable
  • Blood simulant can be used with this product for added realism

So if you are interested in some training aids or MilSpec IFAKS, be sure to check out Phokus Research and use code “COPTALK10” for 10% off your entire order!

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CopTalks Ankle Medical Kit

If you’re reading this article, then I’m assuming that you probably carry a firearm, or are at least are preparing for a traumatic incident. For that alone, I say thank you! Not many people accept the reality of the world we live in, let alone put time, resources and effort into preparations for that world. One of those little preparations is what I want to talk about today: An Ankle Medical Kit.

Medical intervention equipment and training is probably some of the most important EDC you’ll have. Something as simple as a tourniquet or properly applied CPR can quite literally be life changing. Now the issue come, how do I carry it? Well on duty it’s fairly simple, I have a TQ on my belt, car door, duty bags and all that, and if I grab an active shooter bag, I have even more in there. Off duty is another animal, I’m generally not wearing a gun belt or have a trunk of equipment (except the normal BOLT bag and gun) and although I could wear an IFAK pouch on my pants belt, I don’t really like being the center of attention in Wal-Mart.

That’s where the AFAK or Ankle First Aid Kit comes in. Mine is set up for trauma and basically holds most of what I need to handle a gun shot wound and other hemorrhage control. The main body that holds it all together is the Ankle Medical Kit (AMK) by Ryker Nylon. It features 3 main pockets for medical and EDC gear as well as a special internal pouch designed to fit chest seals!

Most of my IFAKs in general are set up to follow the MARCH algorithm. MARCH standing for Massive Hemorrhage, Airway, Respirations, Circulation and Hypothermia/Head trauma. First item in the AFAK is a Gen 4 Recon Medical TQ, a lightweight, heavy duty tourniquet. This handles the initial bleeding control on an extremity wound.

Next is Airway, though I don’t normally carry a nasopharyngeal airway in this kit, it would be very easy to add one to the mix. Instead I chose to carry a Chest Dart to perform a needle chest decompression and 2 vented chest seals. This particular ankle med kit has a pouch specifically designed for 2 NAR Hyfin chest seals, I really like that feature!

Circulation is next on the menu, this is typically the stage where you convert the TQ to a pressure bandage and reassess injuries. I carry some Quik Clot and gauze along with a T-Ban Mini from JBC Corp, these are some of the bulkier items.

Next is Hypothermia and Head trauma, this kit doesn’t really address this at all, but it’s not really meant to. It’s meant to be used on the wearer and in conjunction with your other EDC. There are a few other items that were added, trauma shears for one, Kelly Forceps as well. I also threw in $40 cash for emergencies, a pair of nitrile gloves and a small 5g pack of Celox granules.

Overall it serves its purpose well and has been a great addition to my duty gear and everyday carry. It’s nice to have more than just a tourniquet. but also not have to carry a whole bag. If you’re looking for a similar in between option, I recommend you give this kit a look! Plus the pockets in the Ryker Nylon AMK can hold other gear as well! I use a separate one to hold G43 spare mags, ferro rod and a few other items when I go out and about. The options are only limited by your imagination!

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Taser X26P VS The X26

This article in particular will be featuring the differences and functions of the X26 and X26P electronic control weapons or ECWs. Both are still currently in use by military and law enforcement. In fact a 2010 study titled “Police Use of Force, TASERs and Other Less-Lethal Weapons”, over 15,000 law enforcement and military agencies around the world used tasers as part of their use of force continuum.

Axon currently fields 3 ECWs: the X26P, the X2 and the Taser 7. But for the purpose of this video, we will only be talking about the X26 and the X26P. The X26 was released in 2003 with quite a bit of success and is probably one of the most recognizable Tasers on the market and was taken off the US and Canadian retail and support list officially in 2014. The X26 is and was the most powerful ECW to date with a Charge of 80–135 microcoulombs, in comparison the Current X26P which is capped at a charge of 63 (+/-9) microcoulombs. This led to claims that the newer models were less powerful than the original, which in turn was followed by lawsuits stating their alleged ineffectiveness. Taser/Axon fully denies these claims and states that the newer models with their smart technology and improved performance are just as effective as their predecessors. Newer cartridges like these can feature extended probes, which help defeat thicker clothing and create a better connection for a better chance at NMI or neuro muscular incapacitation.

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The x26 was the first model to support many different options including colors, power packs, cartridges, mounting options and even a camera. The X26P shares many of these options and supposedly new options in development as well. Some key differences between the X26 and X26P:
Holster compatibility, they are not interchangeable
The x26P offers improved weatherproofing, an important consideration for patrol use
The x26 is generally programmed with a 5 second discharge, while as the X26P is also 5 seconds, but can continuously discharge as long as the trigger is held down or the battery is depleted
The X26P does feature better battery life at approximately 500 cycles, vs the X26 at 200
The x26 hold an extra cartridge facing down or out on the power pack while the X26P holds them forward facing
This is beneficial for several reasons, it aids in safer reloading of the ECW and protects the doors of the cartridge from damage which can cause malfunctions.
The X26P does not display a battery percentage anymore, only a battery level indicator, similar to that of a cellphone, and that indicator is rather small.

One thing worth noting is that each discharge of the Taser can be considered a separate use of force requiring justification for each incident. And prolonged or repeated use can be considered excessive force.

Overall I think the X26P is an improvement over the X26 in ease of use, ergonomics, safety features and capabilities. I look forward to what Taser comes out with next and how it changes our perspective and approach in law enforcement and civilian self defense. Thank you for reading, please consider subscribing to our YouTube channel or checking out any of our partners or affiliate links.

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Recon Medical Gen 4 Tourniquet

If you know me, then you know I’m always strapped, which consequently means I always have a tourniquet on my person as well. For years I carried NAR CATs pretty much exclusively, simply for the fact that it was the go to TQ in the military, which means I “borrowed” a few. TQs have come a long way since then and there are a ton of manufacturers pushing their own style, unfortunately this also means there are a lot of fake or “airsoft” tourniquets out there as well. Today I wanted to look at a new kid on the block, the Recon Medical Gen 4 Tourniquet and the legal battle behind it.

I came across these when a subscriber to my YouTube channel sent me an email about them and I ordered a few to try out. I ended up with 2 Gen 3s and 2 Gen 4s to try out and see if they were worth a shit or not. The gen 3s were pretty good, but the gen 4s are what sold me. Let me tell you why.

Metal reinforced buckle on the Gen 4

The Gen 4 addressed 2 of the main issues I had with most tourniquets, the buckle and the windlass. The buckle and windlass on most tourniquets are made of polymer or glass filled nylon, with the exception of a few like the Tac Med Solutions SOFTT. The TQs from Recon Medical feature a windlass made from 6061 aluminum as well as aluminum reinforcement in the buckle, and that is huge. Now it is worth noting that the TQs from Recon Medical are NTOA approved, but not COTCCC approved. That can be make or break for some folks, if you’re not aware the NTOA is the National Tactical Officers Association and COTCCC is the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. COTCCC quite literally wrote the book on combat pre-hospital life support and care and is staffed with doctors, medics, and surgeons. The NTOA is made up of SWAT/SRT operators and medics, who do have field experience and test a lot of equipment.

I myself was a medic in the US Army and I am currently an NAEMT certified TCCC instructor. After I got my hands on the tourniquets from Recon Medical, I tried them on myself, in hands on training and I tried them on circulation mannequins. I was able to achieve 100% occlusion without issue and was able to repeat those results time and time again. The tourniquets Recon Medical produce appear to be high quality, the materials are good, the stitching and manufacturing methods are solid, and the design well thought out. Lets talk about that design for a moment shall we?

The design of the RMT is so close to that of the Composite Resources Inc. Combat Application Tourniquet, that at one point, Recon Medical is actually in a legal battle with CRI. CRI felt so threatened by RM that they actually started a legal battle to try and stop the production of the new tourniquets, and it appears they were somewhat successful. The design had to be slightly changed, but is still 100% effective from what I can tell. One of the actual inventors of the original Combat Application Tourniquets actually commented on the TQs from Recon Medical the quote reads :

“CRI has testified that the reliability of Recon tourniquets is in fact, irrelevant and its
witness Mr. Esposito has testified that the Recon tourniquets are, in fact, “well made.””

Mr. Esposito refers to Mark Esposito, one of the co-inventors of what we commonly know as a Combat Application Tourniquet.

The fact is, from what I can tell, there is still a legal battle between Recon Medical and Composite Resources Inc. (The owner and manufacturer of the CAT) with the last legal update coming out in October of 2020. All the legal paperwork and research can be found on Recon Medical’s website.

Does this affect my opinion on the tourniquet offered by Recon Medical, yes and no. If it really was a low quality, useless product, why would CRI be worried? If it was “dangerous”, why would one of the inventors make a positive comment on it? All I can say at the end of the day is that I can never 100% put my faith in an item made by Man. Sometime shit just breaks, sometimes it doesn’t matter. At the end of the day, my experience with the TQs from Recon has been positive, and I look forward to what they come out with next.

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Suunto Traverse Alpha Stealth Watch

Looking for an Uber rugged, Mil-Spec watch that will probably survive longer than you will in most situations? Look no further because here it is: The Suunto Traverse Alpha. I have the stealth model specifically, and I have been abusing mine for about 3 years now.

I was looking for a military grade time piece that I could drag with me everywhere and had the right functions to make it useful at the same time. The Traverse Alpha offered that, plus some.

The Traverse Alpha comes in several colors and styles

This watch comes loaded with some pretty cool features, from the ordinary, to the oddly specific. Lets take a look at the list below to see what I’m talking about.

  • Hiking, Fishing and Hunting modes
  • Sunrise-sunset times and alerts
  • Fishing and hunting specific POI types
  • Moon phases and moon rise/set times
  • Automatic Shot detection
  • Red backlight, Night Vision Goggle compatible
  • GPS and GLONASS for route and POI navigation
  • Real-time breadcrumb view of the recorded track
  • Tracking for speed, distance and altitude
  • Discover new routes with heatmaps on Suunto app
  • Route preview and route altitude profile on the watch
  • 100 m/330 ft water resistance
  • Altitude (FusedAlti™)
  • Weather trend and storm alarm
  • Compass
  • Backlight in flashlight mode
  • Vibration alarm
  • GPS time update
  • Daily, weekly, monthly and yearly activity tracking of steps and calories
  • Mobile notifications
  • Compatible with Suunto app (iOS and Android)

Some things that the Suunto Traverse Series does not have is a heart rate monitor, but it can be paired with Suuntos heart rate monitor belt to aid you in your workouts.

So not only can this function as a watch, alarm clock, compass and barometer… it also can track your route and where shots are fired. I have to admit, I don’t regularly use all the features on the Suunto, but they are nice to have. It spends most of its time being used as a compass and giving me text notifications. It really is kind of like a sleeper agent on my wrist, living out its mundane daily suburban life, but always ready to spring in to action and live up to it’s potential.

The Suunto isn’t cheap though at +/-$300, nor is it a petit watch.

That being said, you definitely pay for what you get, quality. This watch in bomb proof and amazingly durable. Plus it looks totally badass, which is all that really matters. The battery life really depends on what functions you are using, but mine lasts about 2 weeks between charges and that’s fine with me. I do wish it had some more smart watch capabilities like reading texts or answering calls, but I imagine that would take away from the durability.

All in all I love mine, its tough enough to live on the range, yet classy enough to be worn with a suit. Kind of like me, and that’s why we get along so well. Be sure to watch my video on it below!

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Esty Breaching – Chuck-E-Tool

While searching for a new Halligan bar, I came across this cool little tool from Esty Breaching, a belt mounted high strength pry bar. How cool is that? So where am I supposed to fit this on an already crowded duty belt is what you’re probably thinking. Well this little guy is actually designed to slide behind belt keepers, pouches and other belt accessories. Check it out!

That way you always have it close at hand even if you have to bail out of the car. It’s made of 4130 heat treated steel and designed with a contour to fit your body. It’s also designed to overcome screen doors, gates and some locks.

Look at the curve designed to hug the body/belt

I’ve been rocking this little piece of kit for a few months now, and I have to say I’m impressed! It’s quality made right here in the USA and is available on their website and Amazon for $25 and $30 respectively. I highly recommend that you check them out and give it a try!